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Someone at Google says...

Work life balance can be what you want it to be on most teams. (Some teams are in more competitive sectors and require more crazy hours all the time - but very few of them). If you work 40 hour weeks without putting in anything extra,you'll fall behind them as they advance and you stand still - and maybe that doesn't matter, so it works out for everybody. But at least know where you would realistically stand. If you excel and work your butt off, you'll be compensated and promoted.

Google Interview Questions

Note: ensure you read the disclaimer on the previous page reading the accuracy and sourcing of these problems.

Interview Reports

People at Google Say

This information was sourced from reviews originally posted on Glassdoor.

They take very good care of their people. Lots of challenging work. More manual work than expected. People feeling very entitled, even though they are very nice. Scale and complexity of most of their systems. A significant portion of the people are focused on promotion.
Excellent stock & bonus, if you live on your salary you'll be making some serious bank towards retirement. Competition both to get in and to get promoted is severe and steep. You'll be making slow progress, if any, towards goals of advancement in title and responsibilities.
Amazing people to work with, exciting technology, high impact work. For a company that is all about scale, its biggest problem is scaling to the # employees and the expanding breadth of scope. Some areas are very top heavy. Don't lose the engineering focused culture of trust and openness.
Perks and benefits are awesome. Great people there, I made some friends for life. Systems are overengineered to an extent that making progress is very slow and painful. It's part of the company culture at this point, so when new systems are created they typically suffer from the same problem. Prevent your teams from reinventing the wheel over and over again. Replace the bottom layers of the stack (Kernel, Linux distro, base system daemons) with upstream. Embrace OpenCompute for servers, racks and other DC components.

Engineering Levels

Hover over to see average compensation details. This data was sourced from submissions at levels.fyi.

L3
SWE II
$182,560
$121,029 - Base
$41,690 - Stock
$19,841 - Bonus
L4
SWE III
$255,980
$147,683 - Base
$78,940 - Stock
$29,357 - Bonus
L5
Senior SWE
$348,283
$178,805 - Base
$133,186 - Stock
$36,292 - Bonus
L6
Staff SWE
$461,567
$206,367 - Base
$187,333 - Stock
$67,867 - Bonus
L7
Senior Staff SWE
$625,529
$256,059 - Base
$286,176 - Stock
$83,294 - Bonus

We'll send you 100+ of the most common coding interview questions, once a day with visual explanations. Join over 25,323 users who are doubling their salaries in 30 minutes a day. All subscribers also get an 86-page interview fundamentals PDF and a week of lessons for free.